MonthSeptember 2016

How safe are cell phone radiations??

The radiation from cell phones is so scary that can enter all the way into their midbrain, where tumours are more deadly. Sadly, children and teens are at greatest risk—both for parotid gland tumours and brain tumours—as their thinner skull bones allow for greater penetration of cell phone radiation. In addition, children’s cells reproduce more quickly, so they’re more susceptible to aggressive cell growth. Children also face a far greater lifetime exposure. According to experts, those who begin using cell phones heavily as teenagers have 4 to 5 times more brain cancer as young adults!

Pregnant women would also be wise to avoid cell phones as much as possible. In 2008, researchers analyzed data from nearly 13,000 children and found that exposure to cell phones while in the womb, and also during childhood, were linked to behavioral difficulties. Using handsets just two or three times a day during pregnancy was enough to raise the risk of their babies developing hyperactivity and difficulties with conduct, emotions, and relationships by the time they reached school age—and the risk became even greater if the children also used the phones themselves before the age of seven.
mobile-phone-radiation
Overall, the study revealed that mothers who used mobile phones were 54 percent more likely to have children with behavioral problems. Later on, when the children began using cell phones themselves, they were:
80 percent more likely to suffer from behavioral difficulties
25 percent more at risk from emotional problems
34 percent more likely to suffer from difficulties relating to their peers
35 percent more likely to be hyperactive
49 percent more prone to problems with conduct
It’s important to realize and note that as long as your cell phone is on, it emits radiation intermittently, even when you are not actually making a call. So wearing a cell phone on your hip for 15 hours a day is giving that area of your body nearly continuous radiation exposure.
Previous studies have found that cell phone radiation can affect men’s sperm count, and the quality and motility of their sperm, and this may be a far greater issue than its effect on bone density.
Men in particular may want to reconsider carrying their cell phones on their belts or in their pocket, in close proximity of their reproductive organs. In addition, you have a number of other sensitive organs in that general area, including liver, kidneys, colon and bladder—all of which are susceptible to radiation.

Stay Connected from wherever You Are

Over the past five years, wireless data traffic has increased more than 20,000 percent on AT&T’s wireless network alone. People are no longer only accessing the Internet at home or in the office, they are doing it wherever they are from their mobile device.
AT&T network engineers are helping enable this shift in Internet usage habits by putting in place new technologies, such as Distributed Antenna Systems (DAS). A DAS network consists of many antennas tuned to precisely match the areas of a building or venue where boosted service is needed. AT&T DAS helps address the exponential network traffic growth at large venues and other hard to serve areas, such as sporting and entertainment venues, hospitals, college campuses, airports, hotels, conference centers and more.
DAS helps boost mobile broadband coverage, improve reliability in heavily trafficked areas and enhance network capacity, alleviating pressure on wireless networks when thousands of people in close proximity are actively using their mobile devices simultaneously. DAS is seamless and invisible for customers, but the results are easy to see.
AT&T is a leader in the DAS space and annually installs hundreds of systems across the country. However, as new technology and opportunities present themselves, AT&T’s ASG will continue to adapt and modify the way its DAS perform and operate in order to provide the best possible end-user experience:
Faster Speeds. As DAS deployments continue nationwide at sporting stadiums, campuses, airports and other venues, AT&T is beginning to upgrade and build new DAS with ultra-fast 4G LTE speeds.
DAS on Wheels (DOW). At the recent major political convention in Charlotte, N.C. AT&T rolled out its first ever DAS on Wheels. The mobile DAS consisted of a mobile head end situated in an AT&T truck and portable antennas located throughout a major Charlotte Arena. AT&T is currently exploring future opportunities to deploy DOW.
While many fans might not know that DAS or Wi-Fi are powering their network at Giants games, they do notice the reliable and consistent mobile Internet connection they have come to trust and rely on to enhance the experience at games.

ADC makes a huge DAS system announcement

ADC’s DAS solutions supporting Verizon’s national 4G LTE wireless service rollout. ADC announced that its distributed antenna systems (DAS) solutions are supporting national LTE network rollouts by Verizon Wireless. ADC reports that more than 100 of its InterReach and FlexWave systems have been deployed in major stadiums, urban core areas, and other locations such as the New Meadowlands Stadium and Denver International Airport, where Verizon is rolling out LTE services.
ADC is the carrier’s preferred provider of 700 MHz single-input single-output (SISO) and multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) solutions; the company says its systems are forming a critical part of LTE service rollouts across the United States.

ADC notes that, with a requirement to deliver multi-megabit data services to every user, LTE services demand a new micro-cellular network approach that brings the signal much closer to the subscriber. ADC says its DAS solutions are an efficient way to deliver LTE services because they extend LTE signals out from centralized base stations using highly reliable, low-maintenance antennas.

According to the company, rather than placing femtocells or picocells in thousands of locations, wireless service providers can reduce backhaul and operational expenses by extending signals out from centralized base stations. Also, rather than having to run a complete set of cabling for each service to be provided as with other DAS systems, ADC attests that its DAS solutions support multiple protocols with a single run of low-cost fiber optic and CATV cabling.

The ADC DAS architecture is ideally suited for LTE rollouts because it uses easily deployed antennas to extend services inside buildings and in urban cores,” said John Spindler, vice president of product management for ADC’s Network Solutions Business Unit. “Our systems have been certified for 4G networks by multiple wireless service providers, and they are being deployed at a rapid pace as these operators light up LTE services in new markets.

Filtering ADC for the LTE communication standard, where a second-order Delta–Sigma modulator (DSM) is incorporated into the third-order Chebychev channel-select filter (CSF) of the radio receiver. The CSF introduces an additional third-order suppression of both thermal and quantization DSM noise, while the CSF transfer function is maintained. A design method for the filtering ADC accounting for unavoidable DSM-DAC delays is developed and experimentally demonstrated. The 65 nm CMOS prototype is clocked at 576/288 MHz with an 18.5/9.0 MHz LTE bandwidth, has an in-band gain of 26 dB, an SNDR of 56.4/58.1 dB, an input-referred noise of 5 nV/ Hz√, and an out-of-band (half-duplex) IIP3 of 20/12 dBV rms , with a power consumption of 7.9/5.4 mW and an overall state-of-the art performance.